SaeboGlove Commonly Asked Questions

Scott Thompson
Tuesday, March 24th, 2020


Hello everyone. I’m Scott Thompson, a doctor of occupational therapy and Saebo’s Director of Clinical Services.
Today I’m going to talk to you about the SaeboGlove and some of the commonly asked questions we receive.

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Our Response to COVID-19: How can Saebo Support You?

Scott Thompson
Thursday, March 19th, 2020


An Important Message from Saebo

We at Saebo would like to update you on how we are responding to COVID-19, also known as coronavirus. As we search for new and helpful ways to support our community during these challenging and unprecedented times, we are asking every employee, patient, and healthcare professional one simple question: how can we support you?

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How to Replace the Lace on your SaeboStep Brace: Step-by-Step Instructions

Henry Hoffman
Monday, October 7th, 2019


Replacing SaeboStep Lace

Looking to replace the adjustable lace on your SaeboStep? Watch this video for step-by-step instructions!

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Mental Practice for Stroke Recovery: Using the Mind to Reclaim Movement

Henry Hoffman
Thursday, July 18th, 2019


Mental Practice Exercises for Stroke Recovery

Recovering from a stroke takes hard work, dedication and…imagination? While it might seem like a far-fetched statement, using only the mind to reclaim movement can be a reality for many stroke survivors.

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Dynamic Splints and Contracture: What You Need to Know

Henry Hoffman
Sunday, May 5th, 2019


Surviving a stroke is a debilitating and frightening experience, and survivors are often affected for an extended period of time after suffering a stroke event. During their stroke recovery period, among other complications and conditions, many survivors can  experience spasticity and contractures in the hand. Spasticity and contractures can cause a painful and, sometimes, permanently clenched hand. This post will describe the conditions of spasticity and contractures, answering many of the frequently asked questions on how to treat these conditions with use of orthotics and splinting. So what is spasticity? Let’s take a look…

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Traumatic Brain Injury Spasticity Treatment, Symptoms, and Recovery

Henry Hoffman
Thursday, May 2nd, 2019


Traumatic brain injury, traumatic brain injury spasticity, spasticity in traumatic brain injury, spasticity after tbi, spasticity, what is spasticity, spasticity symptoms, muscle spasticity symptoms, decrease spasticity, stroke spasticity treatment, post stroke spasticity treatment, spasticity treatment exercises, spasticity treatment, how to decrease spasticity, how to treat spasticity, Techniques to decrease spasticity, muscle spasticity treatment.

Spasticity is a common symptom or after-effect of a host of medical conditions and injuries, affecting millions of individuals around the globe. This neuromuscular condition is characterized by motor impairments and weakness, and managing it can be trying for both patients and their loved ones. Every instance of spasticity is unique, and effective rehabilitation will require a personalized approach utilizing the latest evidence-based techniques. Fortunately, patients can decrease spasticity related stiffness, improve fine motor skills, and reduce the frequency of severe muscle spasms with the right strategy and assistive devices, like the state-of-the-art spasticity orthotics offered by Saebo.

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What Is Drop Foot? Foot Drop Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

Henry Hoffman
Wednesday, May 1st, 2019


Foot drop affects millions of individuals around the globe, limiting their mobility and leading to a lower overall quality of life. Motor impairments like foot drop can be frustrating and, at times, exhausting, and those suffering from foot drop are at an increased risk of injury as a result of slips and falls. However, living with foot drop doesn’t have to be a burden, thanks to the many effective therapies now available to improve gait and increase stability. These treatments range from physical therapy exercises, to electrical stimulation for peroneal nerve foot drop, to the latest lightweight assistive foot drop devices, such as the SaeboStep. In this post, we will discuss foot drop causes, recovery, and treatment options. Let’s take a look…

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Home Modification May Be Required for Stroke Survivors

Henry Hoffman
Wednesday, May 1st, 2019


For someone recovering from a stroke, the transition from a hospital or rehabilitation center to a residence can be difficult. While healthcare institutions are equipped to deal with people who have disabilities, most homes are not. Before a stroke survivor returns home, it is important that a physical or occupational therapist visit and make recommendations on adapting the residence to the stroke patient’s special needs. The goal of this evaluation is to ensure that daily living tasks can be performed easily and safely. Once the evaluation is complete, the therapist will meet with the patient, caregiver, family, and/or friends to discuss the home modifications required. While some of these modifications may be as simple as adding grab bars to a shower or installing a raised toilet seat, others may be more extensive, such as construction of a ramp, changes to flooring, or widening of doorways.

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Melodic Intonation Therapy for Stroke Survivors

Henry Hoffman
Tuesday, April 30th, 2019



Stroke is the leading cause of disability today. Many stroke survivors are left with a condition known as aphasia, which is a language disorder that affects the ability to communicate. Aphasia is most often associated with strokes that occur in the left side of the brain, as this is where the areas that control speech and language are
found.

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Hemineglect: Right-Left Brain Function After a Stroke

Henry Hoffman
Monday, April 29th, 2019


The brain consists of two distinct halves, known as the right and left hemispheres. Each hemisphere is responsible for different tasks, including physically controlling the side of the body opposite it. When one hemisphere is damaged by a stroke, the brain may become unable to process or perceive what is occurring in and around the opposite side of the body. In severe cases, stroke patients may be unaware that their opposite side even exists and ignore it completely. This condition, known as hemineglect (also unilateral neglect, hemispatial neglect, or spatial neglect). Hemineglect is most prominent and lasts longer when a stroke damages the right side of the brain. However, damage may also occur on the left side of the brain, resulting in hemineglect on the right side of the body. As a matter of course, medical professionals test stroke patients to determine whether they are suffering from hemineglect.

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