New, Improved SaeboStep Foot Drop Brace: Testimonial

Monday, January 17th, 2022
Last modified on September 13th, 2022


The SaeboStep, a wonderful product, that has been greatly improved.

I have been wearing the SaeboStep every day for several years. I have raved about it to many people, including doctors and therapists. For my foot drop situation, nothing else is as convenient. The SaeboStep is light, well-made, strong, unobtrusive, comfortable, and does not affect the fit of my shoes.

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Foot Drop Treatment Using a Resistance Band

Henry Hoffman
Tuesday, October 12th, 2021
Last modified on September 6th, 2022


Want a quick fix to your foot drop problem?  This blog will share two techniques for helping lift your foot without using an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO).  These techniques are temporary and not meant as a long-term solution but are effective if done correctly. Please consult your physician or medical professional. They might have a better solution for you, like the SaeboStep.

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5 Easy Tests for Foot Drop

Henry Hoffman
Wednesday, September 22nd, 2021
Last modified on September 6th, 2022


5 Easy Test for Foot Drop

Think you suffer from foot drop after a stroke or neurological injury? In this post, we will cover five easy tests to identify foot drop. Foot drop is a common symptom of many neurological and orthopedic issues affecting the lower leg. Most commonly, the peroneal nerve is the affected culprit, causing the lack of ability to lift the foot or toes off the ground. This could lead to a person dragging their foot as they walk, increase the risk of tripping or falling while walking, or cause the person to alter their steppage gait. 

The following tests are simple tests that clinicians use to determine if foot drop, also known as drop foot, exists and if specialized tests by physicians are required for further analysis or diagnosis. These tests are easiest with an observer but can be performed alone by setting up a recording device with sound. In addition, click on the video below if you’d like to watch these tests in action. 

Test #1 – Drag or Slap Test (Visual Observation)

To begin, the first test is the drag or slap test. This test requires an observer, or the test subject, to visually observe the way someone walks. This test has the viewer looking for the common symptoms of foot drop – a dragging foot or a foot that slaps the ground when walking. To test this, have the subject walk approximately 10 to 15 feet. Look for the foot to drag or for the foot to slap the ground when they take a step. Repeat if necessary. In addition, look for altered gait as well as balance deficits.

Test #2 –  Heel Walk Test

Next, the second test is the heel walk test. For this test, have the subject attempt to walk on their heels for approximately 10 to 15 feet. For safety purposes, have the subject hold onto a countertop or use a device like a cane for balance and stability. Look for the subject to have trouble initiating the test, or they will be unable to keep their affected foot in the air the entire time. Do not attempt to test if your subject’s balance is poor. A variation is standing at a counter on their heels and trying to hold toes off the ground. Look for the affected foot to not come off the ground or go back to the ground slowly.

Test #3 – Manual Muscle Test

The third test is the manual muscle test. This test is called a manual muscle (strength) test or MMT. This test can be performed with a clinician assisting you or can be alone. However, you may also find that using the handle of a cane can help you complete this test if you cannot reach your toes, have an altered sitting balance, or are alone. 

To perform this test, you will need to sit in a chair with your affected leg stretched out in front of you. Start by trying to lift your toes and foot off the ground. If you can lift the foot off the ground – assist the foot through its full range of motion, bringing the toes up towards the shin. Try to hold it there. If not performed successfully, this is a positive sign for foot drop. If you can hold the foot in that position, apply pressure on the top of the foot, checking to see if the foot needs moderate or less to break the holding position. In other words, this is a sign of weakness. 

Test #4 – Step Up and Down Test

The fourth test is the step up and down test. This test requires good safety awareness and balance. The test should not be performed if the subject has poor balance or a high chance of falling. Please complete this test with a clinician or therapist. First, have the subject stand in front of a set of steps, holding on to the railing for support. Second, have them slowly step up and down a few times. After that, when they feel confident with this motion, increase the speed of stepping up and down. Look for the foot to drag or for the subject not clear the first step with their toes.

Test #5 – Jump Test

Finally, the last test is the jump test. This test requires good safety awareness and balance. This test should not be performed if the subject has poor balance or a high chance of falling. Please do not complete this test on your own. Complete the test with a therapist or clinician. To begin, while holding onto a counter for support, ask the subject to jump off the ground. Make sure to encourage getting off the ground. Therefore, if the subject is unable to perform this, that is a positive sign for foot drop.

Get Back on Your Feet

The video in this post is part of a series of foot drop videos on our YouTube Channel.  Here at Saebo, we offer an innovative foot drop solution, the SaeboStep. The SaeboStep consists of a lightweight and comfortable foot drop brace that provides optimum foot clearance and support during walking. The SaeboStep was designed to replace uncomfortable, stiff, or bulky splints that go inside the shoe, as well as poorly manufactured braces designed for outside of the shoe that lack support and durability. Don’t forget about all the free resources we offer on saebo.com.


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Foot Drop Recovery: Definition, Causes, & Recovery Solutions

Henry Hoffman
Monday, August 16th, 2021
Last modified on September 28th, 2022


Foot drop, also known as drop foot, is the inability to raise the front part of the foot due to weakness or paralysis of the muscles that lift the foot (National Institute of Neurological Disorders). It can be a temporary or permanent situation, so address this as soon as you see any signs. Foot drop is not a disease but a symptom of an underlying muscular, neurological, or anatomical disorder. This blog will educate you on what foot drop is, common reasons that it occurs, and also possible treatment options.

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How to Treat Foot Drop with Electrical Stimulation

Henry Hoffman
Thursday, August 20th, 2020
Last modified on September 6th, 2022


foot drop treatment with estim

What is Foot Drop?

Foot drop, also known as dropped foot or drop foot, is the inability to raise the front part of the foot up toward the shin. This happens due to weakness or paralysis of the muscles that lift the foot (National Institute of Neurological Disorders). Patients who suffer from foot drop often scuff their toes along the ground; they may also bend their knees to lift their foot higher than usual or swing their leg out to the side to avoid hitting their toes on the ground. Electrical stimulation has been proven to help patients manage symptoms associated with foot drop.

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We are very pleased with the new progress she’s making because of these products.

Monday, January 27th, 2020
Last modified on May 15th, 2020


Open hand facing downward wearing a stroke rehabilitation SaeboGlove - closeup.

My 86 year old Mom has been very healthy until she turned 80 when they had to bypass a subclavian aneurysm. She went into afib a few weeks later and had her first stroke. Three years later an area affected by the first stroke burst causing right-side paralysis. She’s past two years on her second stroke and mainly uses a wheelchair. We are using the SaeboStep for walking to help with dragging her foot. It’s a great product.

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I am a huge advocate for the SaeboStep!

Thursday, November 7th, 2019
Last modified on October 20th, 2021


I have been using the SaeboStep brace since about March 1st, 2019. I already wrote one testimonial about how great it has been for me and how it has allowed me to function and walk almost normally while I am wearing it. In addition to having drop foot I also recently had the TAVR procedure to replace my aortic heart valve. After having the successful procedure I was placed in a cardiac rehabilitation program where I am expected to exercise for 40 minutes 3 days per week in order to regain my stamina after being very sedentary for a long time due to both of my conditions. 

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How to Replace the Lace on your SaeboStep (Gen 1) Brace: Step-by-Step Instructions

Henry Hoffman
Monday, October 7th, 2019
Last modified on September 6th, 2022


Looking to replace the adjustable lace on your SaeboStep? These instructions are for our SaeboStep (Gen 1) model. Watch the video below for step-by-step instructions!

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Our experience with SaeboStep has been amazing since the start!

Wednesday, June 26th, 2019
Last modified on October 20th, 2021


Our experience with SaeboStep has been amazing since the start! Our son was injured in an accident and as a result, has drop foot. We have several expensive AFOs that he has used, but the SaeboStep has allowed him to walk normally and avoid embarrassment from wearing a brace that his teenage friends notice right away. After some months of wear, the boa on the first Saebo quit holding, so we purchased a second SaeboStep.

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The SaeboStep came to my rescue!

Thursday, May 16th, 2019
Last modified on September 29th, 2020


I have recently developed ‘drop foot‘ causing me to become afraid of tripping and falling since I drag my foot when I walk. The doctor wanted to put me in an AFO device that was large and awkward. I knew that I would NEVER wear it, especially in the summer with shorts on. The SaeboStep came to my rescue! According to my doctors, it is not as safe and effective as a full AFO device but the difference is that I am actually USING this device every day and all day and it is serving its purpose. I am walking much better than previously and I have so much more confidence. I no longer drag my foot and fall and hurt myself which I already did once before.

Don’t misunderstand me, having drop foot SUCKS but the SaeboStep helps me a lot, I have been wearing it for a full week and I just ordered a second one to have on hand!!!!

Try it out for yourself and see what you think.

-David E.
Wilmette, IL

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