Foot Drop Treatment Using a Resistance Band

Henry Hoffman
Tuesday, October 12th, 2021


Want a quick fix to your foot drop problem?  This blog will share two techniques for helping lift your foot without using an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO).  These techniques are temporary and not meant as a long-term solution but are effective if done correctly. Please consult your physician or medical professional. They might have a better solution for you, like the SaeboStep.

Read more…

Foot Drop Recovery: Definition, Causes, & Recovery Solutions

Henry Hoffman
Monday, August 16th, 2021


Foot drop, also known as drop foot, is the inability to raise the front part of the foot due to weakness or paralysis of the muscles that lift the foot (National Institute of Neurological Disorders). It can be a temporary or permanent situation, so address this as soon as you see any signs. Foot drop is not a disease but a symptom of an underlying muscular, neurological, or anatomical disorder. The following blog will educate you on what foot drop is, the common reasons that it occurs, and also possible treatment options.

Read more…

How to Treat Foot Drop with Electrical Stimulation

Henry Hoffman
Thursday, August 20th, 2020


foot drop treatment with estim

What is Foot Drop?

Foot drop, also known as dropped foot or drop foot, is the inability to raise the front part of the foot up toward the shin. This happens due to weakness or paralysis of the muscles that lift the foot (National Institute of Neurological Disorders).

Patients who suffer from foot drop often scuff their toes along the ground; they may also bend their knees to lift their foot higher than usual or swing their leg out to the side to avoid hitting their toes on the ground.

Read more…

A Guide to Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Stroke Patients

Henry Hoffman
Thursday, July 16th, 2020


In simple terms, electrical stimulation is the sending of electrical impulses to generate a muscle contraction. This is usually done via surface electrodes stuck to the skin over the target area. The muscle contraction may be very small to help with pain or sensation, or it may be large enough to produce a visible movement at a joint.

Following a stroke or other neurological injury, you may be left with muscle weakness or complete loss of movement (sometimes called hemiplegia). You may also experience a sudden inability to perform everyday tasks, sensory loss, pain, or a combination of these symptoms.

Read more…

Hello, Saebo community! Have you all had a chance to check out our crowdfunding campaign on StartEngine? Don’t miss... https://t.co/TGVsXbOxtr