A Simplified Guide to Occupational Therapy for Strokes

Henry Hoffman
Wednesday, October 26th, 2016
Last modified on May 15th, 2020


a-simplified-guide-to-occupational-therapy-for-strokes-blog

 

Occupational therapy is an essential step along the road to recovery after a stroke. Patients who lose the capacity to perform daily tasks, such as the ability to maintain balance, concentrate, retain information, and even reach for an object, require the expertise of an occupational therapist to relearn these basic movements. The goal of the therapist is to help patients improve sensory and motor abilities that have been damaged. This is accomplished through reprogramming parts of the patients’ brains and helping them regain muscle control.

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How Technology Is Changing Stroke Rehabilitation

Henry Hoffman
Wednesday, August 31st, 2016
Last modified on April 27th, 2021


How Technology Is Changing Stroke Rehabilitation-blog

While everyday objects like clothespins and cups still play crucial roles in most patients’ journeys toward recovery, new technology is constantly changing the rehabilitation game. From video chats with doctors to robotic gloves and interactive video games, stroke recovery and rehabilitation tools have come a long way in the past decade. This new stroke recovery technology is helping link neuroplasticity and learning. A key part in recovery from a stroke.

This new stroke technology gives patients more repetitions, practice time and intensity compared to previous movement trainings. Not to mention this new technology is also more interactive, attention grabbing and really helps motivate the patient. These new technologies are really helping harness the brain’s ability to repair itself in ways that haven’t been seen before.

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Gravity: Stroke Recovery’s Worst Enemy

Henry Hoffman
Tuesday, July 26th, 2016
Last modified on July 27th, 2022


Gravity Stroke-Recovery's-Worst-Enemy-blog

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, but when stroke doesn’t claim lives, it changes them forever. Loss of blood – and, therefore, oxygen – to the brain almost always results in neurological damage. Though each patient’s symptoms are unique, loss of movement, strength, and coordination are common after stroke.

Fortunately, some of this damage can be undone. After stroke, rehabilitation is the most important factor in determining long-term outcomes. Patients may regain independence by retraining their brains and bodies, and many experts are now trained to help them do just that. There is one inescapable force that is always working against them: gravity.

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Which Recovers First After A Stroke, The Arm or The Leg?

Henry Hoffman
Monday, April 11th, 2016
Last modified on December 29th, 2019


 

What recovers first after stroke

Which Recovers First After A Stroke – The Arm or The Leg? By Peter G Levine

“Which comes back first after a stroke, the arm or the leg?”

First-year OT and PT students know the answer to this question: the leg. However, the reasons driving the leg’s speedy recovery are not so simple.

Here are some reasons to rethink this “leg comes back first” perspective.

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Stroke Rehabilitation: Throw Out Those Cones

Henry Hoffman
Monday, March 14th, 2016
Last modified on November 7th, 2023


MedBridge provides clinicians and healthcare organizations a comprehensive education platform that includes clinical education, patient education, and home exercise programs to advance their knowledge, engage patients in their recovery, and improve outcomes.

Do you feel like you’re in a rut? Always doing the same thing? Feeling uninspired? News flash: If you’re bored, your patients are too. It’s time for a change! Some of the most exciting research today is in neuroplasticity and the impact we have as therapists.

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Reclaim Your Stability With Core Exercises For Stroke Recovery

Henry Hoffman
Monday, February 8th, 2016
Last modified on July 27th, 2022


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After a stroke, many patients struggle with poor control and strength in the muscles on one side of the body. While the focus of recovery is often on the limbs and facial muscles, without a strong core, extremities and the rest of the body may suffer. With the help of these core exercises for stroke recovery, you can continue to make recovery progress at home on your own. 

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How To Get The Most Out Of Your Hand Strengthening Program Following A Stroke

Saebo
Tuesday, November 24th, 2015
Last modified on September 9th, 2021


How To Get The Most Out Of Your Hand Strengthening Program Following A Stroke

If you are setting out on a hand strengthening program following a stroke or spinal cord injury, you are seeking to retrain your muscles, joints, mind and central nervous system. All were injured during your neurological event, and all are in need of healing.

Retraining and strengthening a hand is complex and difficult work. It involves much more than going through the mechanical motions. The biggest challenge may be focusing your mind on the healing process, even as your brain, itself, continues to heal. Listed below are four, simple but powerful, strategies to help stick to your hand strengthening program.

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Neurorehabilitation; What Are Some of the Things We Know?

Saebo
Monday, May 5th, 2014
Last modified on May 15th, 2020


There is alot we still don’t know about what constitutes “best practice” when it comes to neurorehabilitation and how to affect optimal recovery and outcomes, but there are some things that we do have a better understanding of. Let’s take stroke recovery and rehabilitation as an example, specifically upper extremity (UE) recovery, since it is reported that at least 50% of individuals who suffer a stroke have UE involvement and impairments (though the numbers vary depending on which study you are reading).

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New Acronyms in the Neurorehabilitation Literature; What Do They Mean?

Saebo
Monday, March 11th, 2013
Last modified on April 2nd, 2019


For those working in upper extremity (UE) neurorehabilitation, the acronyms CIMT (constraint induced movement therapy) and mCIMT (modified constraint induced movement therapy) are now very familiar.

CIMT is an intervention approach which involves restraint of the non-involved UE for 90% of waking hours over a two week period, to include weekends, with repetitive training of the involved UE using shaping principles for 6 hours per day on the weekdays (Kunkel, Kopp, Muller, Villringer, Villringer, Taub, & Flor, 1999).

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