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How to Combat Loss of Fine Motor Skills in Hands

Saebo
Wednesday, January 16th, 2019


A stroke can affect anyone.

The aftereffects of a stroke can change a person’s life by affecting their independence and ability to function. Understandably, this can be a very trying time for both a survivor and their loved ones. It is important to know the effects of stroke on fine motor function when developing exercises and activities for adults after stroke.

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Drug Interactions and Stroke: Can Blood Thinners Cause Strokes?

Saebo
Tuesday, January 15th, 2019


Nearly 800,000 people suffer a stroke every single year in the United States and stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States . Many stroke survivors are prescribed blood thinners and other medications to prevent another, future stroke. Common blood thinners have proven to be effective for minimizing risk of stroke associated with blood clots, but they also come with their own set of risks that are important to understand before starting treatment. Unfortunately, blood thinners can reduce the risk of clot-related stroke only to increase the risk of stroke related to bleeding and blood vessel rupture. To prevent unwanted complications from blood thinners, patients may need to make lifestyle and adjustments moving forward. Understanding the different types of stroke, their treatments, and any potential complications can empower individuals and their loved ones to prevent a second stroke in the future.

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After witnessing the progress and gains made using this device, I don’t know if I can use traditional NMES!

Thursday, December 20th, 2018


Saebo Myotrac Infiniti

I recently demoed the Saebo MyoTrac Infiniti on a patient who suffered a stroke in June 2018. He has been suffering from right shoulder pain, limiting his range of motion and overall function. The patient demonstrates difficulty activating his scapular depressors and retractors during functional movement patterns. Additionally, the patient was reporting significant pain with 8/10 consistently with movement and 6/10 at rest.

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How to Choose the Perfect Stroke Rehab Device for Home Use

Saebo
Friday, December 14th, 2018


 In the months directly following a stroke, there are a multitude of important decisions a stroke survivor and their family must make. Although recovery is a lifelong process, diligent at-home care and utilizing the best equipment for stroke rehabilitation will make the transition from hospital to home more streamlined and effective. Today’s developing market of stroke recovery devices offers countless options to help you supplement and continue the care provided by your hospital and rehabilitation facility, right at home. To help you identify the best devices to support in-home rehabilitation for yourself or the stroke survivor in your life, we’ll consider the five following factors: affordability, ease of use, ability to promote neuroplasticity, evidence-based results, and ongoing product support. Taking all five of these aspects into account will help you create a home environment of supportive, fact-based care for a smooth recovery.

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How to Deal With Incontinence After Stroke

Saebo
Friday, November 30th, 2018


More than 15 million people suffer a stroke worldwide each year. Approximately half of all stroke survivors admitted to a medical facility will be affected by temporary bladder incontinence and one in three will struggle with bowel incontinence. Losing control of one’s bladder or bowel movements can be frustrating and embarrassing for survivors. Fortunately, there are many strategies to help survivors regain bladder and bowel control after suffering a stroke. It’s important to remember that every stroke is different and every recovery and rehabilitation model will be unique for each stroke survivor. In this case, it all starts with a greater understanding of the causes of incontinence.

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What Is the Relationship Between Stroke and Pneumonia?

Saebo
Monday, November 26th, 2018


Functional deficits and motor impairments are common following a stroke. Up to 90 percent of stroke survivors will experience some measure of paralysis or motor deficiency. There are more than 30 muscles involved in the swallowing process and about half of stroke patients suffer from difficulties while swallowing, or dysphagia. It’s important to remember that dysphagia is often temporary for most stroke survivors and this condition will improve for many stroke survivors over time. However, even temporary dysphagia can have dire consequences for stroke survivors and their loved ones leading to a host of complications including pneumonia. Today, one in three stroke survivors will develop pneumonia. Fortunately, there are many strategies ranging from basic lifestyle adjustments to neuromuscular stimulation that can help prevent this potentially life-threatening pulmonary condition.

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I firmly believe the SaeboMAS mini is an essential piece of equipment for upper limb improvement, and would definitely recommend it.

Monday, October 22nd, 2018


SaeboMAS mini

The SaeboMAS mini is a great piece of kit for home use. It allows my husband to exercise his affected arm both independently and safely, and therefore build on exercises learned in therapy sessions. It has also given him the confidence of movement, previously restricted by fear of pain.

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Common Complications After Stroke: What Are They and What Can Be Done?

Saebo
Tuesday, October 16th, 2018


A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is suddenly interrupted, preventing oxygen from reaching the brain and causing brain cells to die quickly. Strokes are one of the leading causes of death and disability, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There are three main types of stroke:

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Drug Interactions and Stroke: Can Drugs Cause Strokes?

Saebo
Tuesday, October 16th, 2018


The average age of a stroke survivor is 68 years old but, in recent years, stroke cases in younger age groups have increased. The direct correlation between drug use and stroke risk is well-known and strokes among younger age groups commonly result from illicit drug use, prescription drug abuse, and other unhealthy lifestyle habits. While not all strokes are preventable, individuals can always practice healthy lifestyle choices to minimize their stroke risk moving forward. Additionally, if an individual does suffer a stroke from drug use or alcohol abuse, drug abuse treatment can play a role in the stroke recovery and rehabilitation process.

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Vitamin Deficiencies and Stroke Risk

Saebo
Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018


The organ systems in our body constantly work in tandem—when one area struggles, the others respond. Vital nutrients such as Vitamin D and B12 help maintain this delicate balance, especially after a neurological disruption like a stroke event. Research connects vitamin deficiencies with both the body’s stroke risk and its ability to recover from a stroke event. An insufficiency in these nutrients—or the inability to absorb them—can cause the three major types of stroke: ischemic, hemorrhagic, and transient ischemic attack, commonly known as a mini-stroke. Ischemic stroke is the most common type of stroke, triggered by a blood clot blocking the flow of oxygen to the brain. Hemorrhagic stroke is a result of internal bleeding in the brain due to a broken blood vessel.

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Co-Founder and Author of Exoskeleton Report, Bobby Marinov, wrote an amazing article about Saebo! Great read, make... https://t.co/5WGb6X5BEP