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A Simplified Guide To Physical Therapy For Strokes

Saebo
Friday, September 9th, 2016


 a-simplified-guide-to-physical-therapy-for-strokes-blog

Having a stroke breaks vital connections between your brain and your muscles, which is why it is the leading cause of long-term disability and almost always results in some loss of mobility and movement. However, this loss isn’t necessarily permanent. In fact, rehabilitation is especially crucial during the early stages of recovery, when patients have little to no control over their affected muscles. No matter where you are in your journey toward recovery, your long-term progress will depend on a consistent physical therapy regimen. Learn why physical therapy for strokes is so helpful for stroke survivors, and what to look for as you select a facility and seek out services for stroke survivors.

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Stroke Recovery: Problems and Solutions

Saebo
Monday, July 25th, 2016


Stroke Recovery Problems & Solutions blog

By Peter G Levine


There is a lot of frustration among stroke survivors about “the system” when it comes to stoke recovery and rehab efforts after stroke. Most of the complaints revolve around three issues:

1. There’s not enough therapy.
2. Clinicians are not well-trained in stroke rehab.
3. Researchers don’t seem to have a clue about what drives recovery.

The following are possible explanations for these (legitimate) gripes.

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Stroke Rehab vs. Stroke Recovery

Saebo
Wednesday, July 20th, 2016


Stroke Rehab Vs. Recovery

By Peter G Levine

First, let’s distinguish the differences between stroke rehab and stroke recovery because they are two distinct terms.

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Specialist Services for Stroke Rehabilitation

Saebo
Monday, July 18th, 2016


Specialist Services for Stroke Rehabilitation

Specialist Services for Stroke Rehabilitation

Strokes can change the way people live their lives forever. Because the brain controls all of the body’s movements, brain damage often manifests as loss of movement and strength in one side of the body. However, this loss doesn’t have to be permanent. While the severity of stroke and speed of treatment play essential roles in determining a patient’s symptoms, stroke rehabilitation is the most important factor in determining a patient’s long-term outcome.

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Young Stroke Awareness

Saebo
Wednesday, May 25th, 2016


Young Stroke Awareness for Stroke Awareness Month

Stroke Awareness Month

May is stroke awareness month and we wanted to shed some light on young stroke to bring more awareness too it. Typically, when you think of a stroke, you think of it happening in people that are over 65+. In reality though, it can happen at any age. It is true that your stroke risk increases with age, but stroke in young people does happen to infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. There is even statistics showing that the number of cases of young stroke in increasing. We have put together an infographic that highlights the facts about young stroke and ways that we can progress towards prevention, care and recovery.

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Helping Stroke Survivors with Evidence-Based Practice

Saebo
Friday, March 25th, 2016


 

Helping Stroke Survivors with Evidence-Based Practice

Helping Stroke Survivors with Evidence-Based Practice By Peter G Levine

Everyone talks a big game with evidence-based practice (EBP) in stroke. You can’t go to any occupational or physical therapy seminars without the term being thrown around like confetti. Beyond the platitudes, what is EBP? How can EBP be clinically implemented to help stroke survivors? Finally, what are the best resources to access EBP for stroke?

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The Stroke Belt

Saebo
Wednesday, September 16th, 2015


The Stroke Belt

 

Strokes aren’t always predictable or preventable. However, there are many different traits and habits that overwhelmingly correspond to higher risks, so it’s easier than ever to determine your individual risk factors. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) added another factor to the list when they began to collect and compare data about strokes in each individual state.

The CDC confirmed decades’ worth of evidence that strokes consistently occur in some regions more than others. Their research also unveiled some startlingly specific risks: eleven states had unusually high stroke rates and mortality rates. Following this revelation, several organizations have conducted research to compare stroke prevalence, care costs, mortality rates, behavioral risks, and other factors on a state-by-state basis.

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Stroke, Not so Old…

Shannon Scott, OTR/L
Thursday, December 19th, 2013


Social Issue

According to the American Heart Association (AHA, 2013) stroke can occur at any age however recent studies indicate that over the past 15 years there has been an increase in the incidence of ischemic stroke occurring in young adults (George, Tong, Kuklina, & Labarthe, 2011). Risks associated with increased obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco and alcohol use have been proposed factors contributing to this rise (George et al., 2011). With increased rates of survival, younger individuals are living longer with disability and the direct and indirect costs associated with healthcare and lost productivity can be significant (George et al., 2011; Wolf, Baum, & Connor, 2009). According to AHA (2013), loss of earnings is projected to be the highest costs associated with stroke.

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Good News; Healthcare Reform and Changes in Medicare

Shannon Scott, OTR/L
Thursday, June 6th, 2013


As clinicians, our ability to provide therapy services to clients is influenced by federal laws and regulations, administrative laws from agencies, and sometimes case law. It becomes challenging to keep track of all the changes that occur in the laws, rules, and regulations that impact our practice. More often, we are aware of changes that negatively impact our ability to provide comprehensive and medically necessary skilled services to achieve optimum client outcomes, such as therapy caps. We are also aware of changes in regulations that impact what we document and the way we document.

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Is What You’re Doing Working? How Do You Know?

Shannon Scott, OTR/L
Thursday, April 25th, 2013


As many of you are already aware, those billing to Medicare for therapy coverage now have to report functional outcome data for clients in the form of new non-payable G codes. The G codes are designed to capture the primary issue for which therapy is being provided for. This includes issues such as mobility, changing/maintaining body position, carrying/moving/handling objects, and self-care to name a few. G codes are accompanied by modifiers which indicate the client’s area of limitation and are designed to help track functional changes over time which subsequently results in payment information. These codes are required to not only to be included in the claim to Medicare but also in the client’s medical record with an indication of what tools and outcome measures were used to assess functional outcome. Reporting started in January for a trial 6 month period and beginning July 1/13 claims will not be accepted without the required functional data.

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