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How Technology Is Changing Stroke Rehabilitation

Saebo
Wednesday, August 31st, 2016


How Technology Is Changing Stroke Rehabilitation-blog

While everyday objects like clothespins and cups still play crucial roles in most patients’ journeys toward recovery, new technology is constantly changing the rehabilitation game. From video chats with doctors to robotic gloves and interactive video games, stroke recovery and rehabilitation tools have come a long way in the past decade. This new stroke recovery technology is helping link neuroplasticity and learning. A key part in recovery from a stroke.

This new stroke technology gives patients more repetitions, practice time and intensity compared to previous movement trainings. Not to mention this new technology is also more interactive, attention grabbing and really helps motivate the patient. These new technologies are really helping harness the brain’s ability to repair itself in ways that haven’t been seen before.

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A Simplified Guide To Rehabilitation Nursing For Strokes

Saebo
Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016


A Simplified Guide To Rehabilitation Nursing For Strokes

A Simplified Guide To Rehabilitation Nursing For Strokes

Rehabilitation is a crucial part of stroke recovery, and rehabilitation nursing can be one of the best services to enlist in recovering from a stroke. This resource guide will cover everything you need to know about rehabilitation nursing for stroke recovery. From its main purpose and benefits, to the questions you need to ask before selecting a rehabilitation center, we’ve got you covered.

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Questions To Ask Your Occupational Therapist

Hoang Tran
Thursday, February 18th, 2016


Questions to ask your occupational therapist

This guest post was provided to us by Hoang Tran from Hands On Therapy

So maybe you have had an injury to your body such as a broken bone or surgery, an injury to your brain such as a stroke or a brain injury, or have a condition that is affecting your ability to function independently like you were before such as Parkinson’s. If any one of these conditions affect how you live your life and how you want to function with less difficulty, you may be looking for an Occupational Therapist. I am and occupational therapist and certified hand therapist. With some 15 years of experience now, I’ve had the opportunity to see a great deal of patients in various settings and with various conditions. I have been asked a lot of questions along the way, and there are also a lot of questions that I want my patients to make sure they ask when seeking out certain type of help.

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Stroke, Not so Old…

Shannon Scott, OTR/L
Thursday, December 19th, 2013


Social Issue

According to the American Heart Association (AHA, 2013) stroke can occur at any age however recent studies indicate that over the past 15 years there has been an increase in the incidence of ischemic stroke occurring in young adults (George, Tong, Kuklina, & Labarthe, 2011). Risks associated with increased obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco and alcohol use have been proposed factors contributing to this rise (George et al., 2011). With increased rates of survival, younger individuals are living longer with disability and the direct and indirect costs associated with healthcare and lost productivity can be significant (George et al., 2011; Wolf, Baum, & Connor, 2009). According to AHA (2013), loss of earnings is projected to be the highest costs associated with stroke.

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Good News; Healthcare Reform and Changes in Medicare

Shannon Scott, OTR/L
Thursday, June 6th, 2013


As clinicians, our ability to provide therapy services to clients is influenced by federal laws and regulations, administrative laws from agencies, and sometimes case law. It becomes challenging to keep track of all the changes that occur in the laws, rules, and regulations that impact our practice. More often, we are aware of changes that negatively impact our ability to provide comprehensive and medically necessary skilled services to achieve optimum client outcomes, such as therapy caps. We are also aware of changes in regulations that impact what we document and the way we document.

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Is What You’re Doing Working? How Do You Know?

Shannon Scott, OTR/L
Thursday, April 25th, 2013


As many of you are already aware, those billing to Medicare for therapy coverage now have to report functional outcome data for clients in the form of new non-payable G codes. The G codes are designed to capture the primary issue for which therapy is being provided for. This includes issues such as mobility, changing/maintaining body position, carrying/moving/handling objects, and self-care to name a few. G codes are accompanied by modifiers which indicate the client’s area of limitation and are designed to help track functional changes over time which subsequently results in payment information. These codes are required to not only to be included in the claim to Medicare but also in the client’s medical record with an indication of what tools and outcome measures were used to assess functional outcome. Reporting started in January for a trial 6 month period and beginning July 1/13 claims will not be accepted without the required functional data.

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