Start a Risk Free Trial Today! Patients Clinicians

Reclaim Your Dexterity With 25 Hand Exercises For Stroke Recovery

Saebo
Friday, July 13th, 2018


A stroke can take a seemingly healthy and vibrant individual and change their life in an instant. Learning how to do basic daily tasks, such as self-feeding or getting dressed each day, can quickly feel like an overwhelming physical hurdle. Despite having full active movement in your affected hand, you may have decreased strength and dexterity in your hand due to your stroke. This may be making it difficult to grasp and release objects, making daily tasks seem like insurmountable obstacles. We will show you some helpful hand exercises for stroke recovery to help you reclaim your strength and dexterity.

Unfortunately, sometimes rehab does not bring back full control and use of your hands, making these daily tasks a tremendous challenge. While you begin your recovery it’s crucial that you incorporate hand exercises for stroke recovery into your daily life to bring back dexterity and use of your fingers.

Read more…

Saebo Announces Notification for Allowance from U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for New Sensor-Embedded Hand Treatment Device for Neurological Clients

Saebo
Thursday, October 26th, 2017


CHARLOTTE, N.C. – October 26, 2017– Saebo, Inc., a medical device company specializing in affordable and novel clinical solutions designed to improve mobility and function, announced on Thursday a new patent awarded to address hand function following a neurological injury. Saebo’s latest technology transforms the neuroprosthetic industry by embedding biofeedback (EMG) sensors, along with stimulation electrodes, into an affordable neuro glove, so clients can improve independence and motor control.

Read more…

Henry Hoffman Q&A Video Series: Why SaeboStim Micro?

Saebo
Monday, October 16th, 2017


Are you stimulating the affected side enough?

Saebo Co-Founder Henry Hoffman discusses the importance of SES and an effective home rehabilitation program in his latest Q&A video.

Read more…

How Technology Is Changing Stroke Rehabilitation

Saebo
Wednesday, August 31st, 2016


How Technology Is Changing Stroke Rehabilitation-blog

While everyday objects like clothespins and cups still play crucial roles in most patients’ journeys toward recovery, new technology is constantly changing the rehabilitation game. From video chats with doctors to robotic gloves and interactive video games, stroke recovery and rehabilitation tools have come a long way in the past decade. This new stroke recovery technology is helping link neuroplasticity and learning. A key part in recovery from a stroke.

This new stroke technology gives patients more repetitions, practice time and intensity compared to previous movement trainings. Not to mention this new technology is also more interactive, attention grabbing and really helps motivate the patient. These new technologies are really helping harness the brain’s ability to repair itself in ways that haven’t been seen before.

Read more…

Tried and True Solutions For Stroke Pain Management

Saebo
Thursday, August 18th, 2016


Tried and True Solutions For Stroke Pain Management-blog

 

After stroke, loss of mobility isn’t the only long-term problem that prevents survivors from resuming normal activities. Post-stroke pain affects more than half of all stroke survivors. In some cases, this pain is chronic, leaving survivors with constant discomfort and hypersensitivity. Let’s walk through the common types of pain that stroke survivors experience, and introduce the tools and therapeutic techniques that were designed to reduce it and restore mobility.

Read more…

The Brunnstrom Stages of Stroke Recovery

Saebo
Wednesday, September 9th, 2015


The Brunnstrom Stages of Stroke Recovery

 

Life after a stroke can be challenging. Many patients wonder if they will ever fully recover their muscle coordination, or how long or difficult the process of recovery may be. Fortunately, the field of occupational and physical therapy has come a long way in developing approaches that help patients regain controlled muscle movements after a stroke.
There are seven recognized stages of stroke recovery through which most patients progress. Also known as the Brunnstrom Approach, the seven stages framework views spastic and involuntary muscle movement as part of the process and uses them to aid in rehabilitation.  

 

Read more…

Strengthening a Spastic Muscle. Why the Kerfuffle?

Henry Hoffman
Wednesday, August 19th, 2015


Not as much now, but in the recent past, discussing strength training a hyperactive or spastic muscle was a very controversial topic amongst clinicians at happy hour, in the clinic, or at CEU’s. For many, the thought of having upper motor neuron lesion clients squeeze their hyperactive finger flexors or flex their spastic biceps in the late 1980-90’s (and earlier) would have made many clinicians cringe. The visual that comes to mind for me is something out of a CSI show, but instead of a homicide, you were looking at a clinical “assault and battery” where security would have been called and the crime scene tape would have been wrapped around the patient and the plinth. The suspected serial criminal then would have collected his or her belongings and performed the famous perp walk out of the clinic for all of the fellow clinicians to see. Yes, the media would have eventually covered this story and learned that this inept clinician, known publically now as “high toner”, would be linked to previous clinical crimes ranging from “excessive upper trap activation” to “absence of manual cues”. OK, maybe a bit melodramatic and a tad over-exaggerated, but I think you get the idea.

Read more…

Neurorehabilitation; What Are Some of the Things We Know?

Shannon Scott, OTR/L
Monday, May 5th, 2014


There is alot we still don’t know about what constitutes “best practice” when it comes to neurorehabilitation and how to affect optimal recovery and outcomes, but there are some things that we do have a better understanding of. Let’s take stroke recovery and rehabilitation as an example, specifically upper extremity (UE) recovery, since it is reported that at least 50% of individuals who suffer a stroke have UE involvement and impairments (though the numbers vary depending on which study you are reading).

Read more…

How Effective is Botox in Improving UE Function?

Shannon Scott, OTR/L
Monday, July 22nd, 2013


Muscle spasticity is a negative symptom which can occur following a central nervous system disorder (Kinnear, 2012). The use of Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTX-A), commonly referred to as Botox, is used extensively in the treatment of muscle spasticity following stroke and other neurological conditions. Following BTX-A injections, physical and occupational therapy are typically provided and include stretching, casting, splinting, strengthening, and functional movement retraining (Kinnear, 2012).

Having provided the above types of occupational therapy interventions with numerous individuals who have received Botox injections to the UE, I have formulated my own opinions as to the functional benefits of Botox injections in the UE.  I recently did a literature review to find out what the research reports.

Read more…

What works for some survivors may not work for others, so make sure to understand potential difficulties and inform... https://t.co/WRDkuWRmTK